Septiembre 11th, 2014
filmception:

Cinema Paradiso (1988) dir. Giuseppe Tornatorefeat. The Firemen of Viggiu / I pompieri di Viggiù (1949) dir. Mario Mattoli

filmception:

Cinema Paradiso (1988) dir. Giuseppe Tornatore

feat. The Firemen of Viggiu / I pompieri di Viggiù (1949) dir. Mario Mattoli

istmodelasfauces:

Cinema Paradiso

istmodelasfauces:

Cinema Paradiso

(Fuente: bustyasianbabes)

Agosto 23rd, 2014
85anti:

Alfred Hitchcock’s The Birds (1963)

85anti:

Alfred Hitchcock’s The Birds (1963)

Agosto 21st, 2014
Agosto 19th, 2014
Agosto 18th, 2014
cinephiliabeyond:
Forgotten Silver (1995) is a New Zealand film mockumentary that purports to tell the story of a pioneering New Zealand filmmaker. It was written and directed by Peter Jackson and Costa Botes, both of whom appear in the film in their roles as makers of the documentary. It purports to tell the story of ‘forgotten’ New Zealand filmmaker Colin McKenzie, and the rediscovery of his lost films, which presenter Peter Jackson claims to have found in an old shed. McKenzie is presented as the first and greatest innovator of modern cinema, single-handedly inventing the tracking shot (by accident), the close-up (unintentionally), and both sound and color film years before their historically documented creation. It features deadpan commentary from actor/director Sam Neill and director and film archivist John O’Shea, as well as critical praise from international industry notables including film historian Leonard Maltin, and Harvey Weinstein of Miramax Films. In reality, McKenzie is a fictional character, and the films featured in Forgotten Silver were all created by Peter Jackson, carefully mimicking the style of early cinema. The interviewees are all acting. 

cinephiliabeyond:

Forgotten Silver (1995) is a New Zealand film mockumentary that purports to tell the story of a pioneering New Zealand filmmaker. It was written and directed by Peter Jackson and Costa Botes, both of whom appear in the film in their roles as makers of the documentary. It purports to tell the story of ‘forgotten’ New Zealand filmmaker Colin McKenzie, and the rediscovery of his lost films, which presenter Peter Jackson claims to have found in an old shed. McKenzie is presented as the first and greatest innovator of modern cinema, single-handedly inventing the tracking shot (by accident), the close-up (unintentionally), and both sound and color film years before their historically documented creation. It features deadpan commentary from actor/director Sam Neill and director and film archivist John O’Shea, as well as critical praise from international industry notables including film historian Leonard Maltin, and Harvey Weinstein of Miramax Films. In reality, McKenzie is a fictional character, and the films featured in Forgotten Silver were all created by Peter Jackson, carefully mimicking the style of early cinema. The interviewees are all acting. 

cinephiliabeyond:

Buster Keaton’s 1960′s autobiography, ‘My Wonderful World of Slapstick,’ is a view into the quirky mind behind the stoic face of the legendary film comedian. The book is available for free from the Internet Archive [pdf, epub, Kindle].

Here’s the episode of ‘Cinéma cinémas’ with Buster Keaton, 1964.  

Orson Welles introduces Buster Keaton’s masterpiece, ‘The General.’


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cinephiliabeyond:

Buster Keaton’s 1960′s autobiography, ‘My Wonderful World of Slapstick,’ is a view into the quirky mind behind the stoic face of the legendary film comedian. The book is available for free from the Internet Archive [pdf, epub, Kindle].

Here’s the episode of ‘Cinéma cinémas’ with Buster Keaton, 1964.  

Orson Welles introduces Buster Keaton’s masterpiece, ‘The General.’

cinephiliabeyond:

John Cassavetes and Shafi Hadi during the recording of Charles Mingus’ original score to Cassevetes’ 1959 directorial debut film ‘Shadows.’ [ciudadsaudade]
What was Charlie Mingus’ role in the soundtrack for ‘Shadows’?Al Ruban: Mingus worked on a score, but he was more organized than John wanted. And I don’t think that was apparent to John at the beginning. He did all this music, and John loved it, but he really wanted control. John needed to improvise some things because he couldn’t communicate what he wanted to get across. —Out of the Shadows: John Cassavetes

Above: Charles Mingus at the recording session for ‘Shadows.’ Image courtesy photographer Marvin Lichtner.
“In November 1958, John Cassavetes premiered his revolutionary independent film ‘Shadows’ in a series of midnight screenings at the Paris Theater in New York City. Village Voice critic Jonas Mekas immediately proclaimed it a work of genius, calling it ‘the most frontier-breaking American feature in at least a decade.’ Most audience members, including Cassavetes, hated it. Cassavetes reassembled his cast and crew and shot extensive new footage, modifying old scenes and adding new ones. The final version premiered at Amos Vogel’s legendary Cinema 16 on November 11, 1959, and was an overnight critical sensation. One of the myths that propelled ‘Shadows’ to instant notoriety was its improvisational origins. It’s considered by many to be the first ‘true’ cinematic jazz narrative, both for its racially charged subject and its unconventional, unscripted making in the streets of Manhattan. It’s been further celebrated for an original score by one of the all-time jazz greats, Charles Mingus. However much of the legend is deceptive. Little of Mingus’s music appears in the final film. Actual jazz scenes are conspicuously absent. And recent writings by Ray Carney, Tom Charity and others have attempted to debunk or clarify much of the improvisation myth.” —Passing Shadows: Cassavetes And Mingus
Thomas Reichman’s hour-long documentary tribute to the legend below:

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:
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cinephiliabeyond:

John Cassavetes and Shafi Hadi during the recording of Charles Mingus’ original score to Cassevetes’ 1959 directorial debut film ‘Shadows.’ [ciudadsaudade]

What was Charlie Mingus’ role in the soundtrack for ‘Shadows’?
Al Ruban: Mingus worked on a score, but he was more organized than John wanted. And I don’t think that was apparent to John at the beginning. He did all this music, and John loved it, but he really wanted control. John needed to improvise some things because he couldn’t communicate what he wanted to get across. Out of the Shadows: John Cassavetes

Above: Charles Mingus at the recording session for ‘Shadows.’ Image courtesy photographer Marvin Lichtner.

“In November 1958, John Cassavetes premiered his revolutionary independent film ‘Shadows’ in a series of midnight screenings at the Paris Theater in New York City. Village Voice critic Jonas Mekas immediately proclaimed it a work of genius, calling it ‘the most frontier-breaking American feature in at least a decade.’ Most audience members, including Cassavetes, hated it. Cassavetes reassembled his cast and crew and shot extensive new footage, modifying old scenes and adding new ones. The final version premiered at Amos Vogel’s legendary Cinema 16 on November 11, 1959, and was an overnight critical sensation. One of the myths that propelled ‘Shadows’ to instant notoriety was its improvisational origins. It’s considered by many to be the first ‘true’ cinematic jazz narrative, both for its racially charged subject and its unconventional, unscripted making in the streets of Manhattan. It’s been further celebrated for an original score by one of the all-time jazz greats, Charles Mingus. However much of the legend is deceptive. Little of Mingus’s music appears in the final film. Actual jazz scenes are conspicuously absent. And recent writings by Ray Carney, Tom Charity and others have attempted to debunk or clarify much of the improvisation myth.” Passing Shadows: Cassavetes And Mingus

Thomas Reichman’s hour-long documentary tribute to the legend below:

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going: